Reflection at the shore

I decided to paint something different this week.

Happy Sunday! πŸ™‚

Weeds and grass at the lake shore. Although it sounds like a simple subject, I worried that painting this photo would not turn out very well.

Lake weeds at the shore

My painting inspiration, a photo at the lake.

A few notes and tips before I share my results with you…

  • The water was painted first and after it dried I layered the grasses on top.
  • As you get further away, waves should be smaller and their color should be lighter.
  • For the weeds and grass, I used different sized brushes, different color mixes, and switched back and forth frequently.
  • Brushes used: Round #12, Flat angle 1/2 inch, and Liner #2
  • Painted while standing instead of sitting, it was a nice change.

 

My first attempt was a good practice. One problem that stands out is that there are not enough dark values. What I really like in this painting though is the feeling of movement in the grass and weeds.

Reflection at the shore watercolor

Reflection at the shoreΒ  – 9 x 12 inch Bee watercolor paper

Then my second attempt… a very different result, darker and bolder.

Probably went a little too far with dark values this time, a little over correction. πŸ˜‰

Reflection at the shore 2 watercolor

Reflection at the shore 2Β  –Β  9 x 12 inch Bee watercolor paper

Before starting the first painting, I had to hush that little voice telling me that I could not do this. I realized that I just had to get out of my own way and go for it. In the end, I had fun and learned something. That makes me happy. πŸ™‚

I hope you are inspired to create art and do what you love. Thank you for stopping by and following along. Until next time, share a simile and sprinkle kindness all around.

Happy Painting! ❀

Patty Anne

PattyAnneArt on Instagram

PattyAnneArt

Naming artwork

A little flower practice using a 1/2 inch Flat angle brush.

Happy little petals your way today. πŸ™‚

Baby blue flowers

I’ve been trying to come up with more thoughtful names for my artwork. I am finding that naming artwork is challenging. This small 6 x 9 inch piece I named, Baby Blues.

I wonder what the best approach is when naming artwork.

Maybe asking a few questions would be helpful before selecting a name…

  • What do I see?Β  (this is my usual method, somewhat descriptive)
  • What do I feel when I look at this piece?
  • What did I feel when I created this piece?
  • Does this piece bring back a special memory?
  • Does this piece have a special meaning?

Then again, am I just overthinking the process?Β  Is it best to just go with your gut (or what comes to mind right away)?

Do you have a method that works well for you? I would love to hear how you choose a name.

Thank you for stopping by and following along. I hope you are inspired to create art and do what you love.

Until next time, be the light and shine on! ❀

Happy Painting!

Patty Anne

PattyAnneArt on Instagram

PattyAnneArt

 

Dreamy Orange Crush

More transparent watercolor petals to share with you today.

A little splashy orange crush. πŸ™‚

Hope you have a great day and find time to do what you love.

Happy Thursday! ❀

Peachy transparent watercolor flowers

Orange Poppies – 9 x 12 inch Bee watercolor paper.

For this painting, I slowly layered soft petals like I did in my last post. But this time, I continued on and developed the painting a bit further.

I hope you enjoy seeing my work and are inspired to create art and do something you love. Until next time, share a smile and sprinkle kindness everywhere.

Happy Painting!

Patty Anne

PattyAnneArt on Instagram

PattyAnneArt

Transparent Watercolor Petals

Transparent watercolor petals, delicate and lovely.

Happy Sunday! πŸ™‚

This week I thought it would be fun to share with you a simple technique for painting layers of soft petals in watercolor.

A few key points before we get started:

– the goal is to slowly build up color with each layer of paint

– start with a very light color

-each layer added is a little darker

– let each layer dry before adding the next one (very important!)

– a round brush works well for this (I used size 12)

Each layer of color is mixed to be slightly darker than the previous layer. Adding more water to a color mix will give you a lighter shade which works well for this exercise.

This is what I used…

Pink Color mixing

Daniel Smith watercolors:

Layer 1-Β  Quin Rose + Yellow Ochre
Layer 2 – Quin Rose + Yellow OchreΒ  (slightlyΒ darker than Layer 1)
Layer 3 – Quin Rose + Yellow Ochre + Mayan Orange
Layer 4 – Quin Rose + Yellow Ochre + Mayan Orange (slightly darker than Layer 3)

Transparent Watercolor Petals - Layer 1

First layer is very light and pale.

Transparent Watercolor Petals - Layer 2

Second layer, adding a few different petal shapes with a slightly darker shade of pink. Things don’t look very good at this point, but hang in there it gets better. πŸ™‚

The hardest part is waiting for things to dry completely between layers.

I also added a few tiny green stems to build up later.

Transparent Watercolor Petals - Layer 3

Another layer adding a few more petals with a slightly darker color…

Layer 3 is looking a little better now.

Transparent Watercolor Petals - Layer 4

Then a last 4th layer of darker petals. It gets pretty exciting at this point when the flowers start to take shape.

You could stop now or continue on and develop your painting further. I decided to just leave this one as is.

I hope you enjoyed this little exercise. It is an easy way to develop soft, delicate watercolor flowers. Let me know if this was helpful, I would love to hear from you.

Until next time, share a smile and sprinkle kindness all around.

Happy Painting!

Patty Anne

PattyAnneArt on Instagram

PattyAnneArt

 

Eucalyptus leaves

A simple painting of Eucalyptus leaves today.

Calm and soothing greens and blues.

I love the combination of a simple ink sketch with soft colors.

Eucalyptus leaves ink and watercolor

Eucalyptus Leaves – 9 x 12 inch bee watercolor paper

Daniel Smith watercolors used:

Cerulean Blue
Phthalo Blue
Cascade Green
Buff Titanium

Sketched using a black Micron pen, size .03

I bought a set of black Micron pens with a wonderful travel case. It had room for additional pens and so… I filled it up. πŸ™‚ I also managed to fit my mechanical pencil in the case as well.

I love having this little case next to me whenever I am sketching, everything I need is visible and right on hand. ❀ I’ve mentioned these pens in other posts and thought you might like to see what I’ve been using.

Micron pens in travel case

 

I like to think that I am painting myself happy. I hope you enjoy seeing my happy art and it inspires you create and do something you love.

Thank you for stopping by and following along. ❀ Until next time, share a smile and sprinkle kindness everywhere.

Happy Painting!

Patty Anne

PattyAnneArt on Instagram

Patty Anne Art

Leaves – watercolor and ink

I’ve been sketching and painting leaves again. There is something about leaves that I find very calm and soothing.Β  Hope you enjoy…

Happy Sunday! πŸ™‚

Watercolor leaves

A fun practice with different shades of green and blue, my favorite colors. I used my Princeton 1/4 inch Dagger brush for these paintings.Β  I love that brush so much!

It was fun to play around with different shapes and just enjoy the painting process. ❀

Watercolor Tip: A clean tissue is always handy to have on hand for blotting. I use one when I put down too much color or too much water on the paper. Just remember to be gentle so that you don’t damage the surface of your paper.

Watercolor leaves

Both watercolor paintings are on 6 x 9 inch individual sheets of Bee watercolor paper.

Continuing on with a few ink sketches…

Leaves ink sketch

I love the simplicity of this one. It just feels good.

When I am sketching or doodling, I try not to overthink what I am doing.

If I think about the pen in my hand and the movement of my hand, either the line I am making or going to make, things don’t work out very well for me. It sounds funny but I need a general plan and then I have to be deliberate with the pen and sketch without fear.

Flowing leaves ink sketch

Ink on mixed media paper using black Micron pens

Thank you for stopping by and following along. I hope you find time to create art and do something you love.Β Until next time, have a great week.

Happy Painting!

Patty Anne

PattyAnneArt on Instagram

Patty Anne Art

Backyard Cardinal and watercolor

I snapped a cute photo of a female Cardinal on my backyard feeder. I thought it would be fun to paint this lovely bird and share my watercolor process with you.

Happy Sunday!

My painting inspiration and backyard capture… a lovely Cardinal ❀

Female Cardinal photo

I started thinking about the colors I would need for this painting while viewing the photo on my laptop.Β  Below is a little test sheet with notes on the colors mixed and used.

 

color testing

Color mixing notes (Daniel Smith watercolors)
Orange:Β  Quinacridone Rose and Hansa Yellow light
Brown:Β  Yellow Ochre and Payne’s Gray
Red:Β  Deep Scarlet and Payne’s Gray
Purple:Β  Ultramarine Blue, Quinacridone Rose, and Payne’s Gray

The initial sketch and first light wash

initial wash - female cardinal

With the first wash I put down enough color to define the overall shape and create a nice base to build on.

I just love her gorgeous feather tiara. πŸ™‚Β  She looks like the queen of the backyard.

 

Second wash - female cardinalΒ The second wash starts to bring things to life as I build up color and add some darker values. As you can see, there is still more work that needs to be done.

 

Female Cardinal 3rd wash

The third wash builds up even more color and includes the addition of a background. I thought it was finished at this point. But after the painting dried I decided it needed a few more small details. I used a black micron pen with a very small tip (.005) and a white gel pen for the additional details.

 

Female Cardinal watercolor

I also brightened up the green a bit in the background before calling this one done.

Watercolor Tips:

  • Test out your colors on scrap paper first and write down notes on color mixing.
  • When sketching on watercolor paper, be careful to use a light touch. I recently used some new paper and found that it easily became bruised from my pencil markings. I realized the problem only after I started painting…..lesson learned and a good reminder going forward.

I hope you enjoyed seeing my watercolor process and are inspired to create art.

Thank you for stopping by and following along. Until next time, share a smile and do something you love.

Happy Painting!

Patty Anne

Patty Anne Art on Instagram

Patty Anne Art