Pink Dogwood Tree

The Pink Dogwood tree in my yard is in full bloom.  It is such a beauty!
This is watercolor painting #364 from my 7×10 Mixed Media sketchbook – inspired by my Pink Dogwood tree.

Pink Dogwood Tree in Bloom
Pink Dogwood Tree in Bloom

A few tips and notes:

  • Mixed media paper doesn’t handle as much water and pigment as watercolor paper.
  • It was difficult to get the fun mingling of colors in the watercolor washes on this paper.
  • After the painting dried, I ended up liking it more than when I was working on it.
  • I need to push myself to use brighter colors and washes.

Happy Painting!

-Patty Anne-

 

 

 

Bleeding Hearts in Bloom

This is from May 2016, 5×8 watercolor sketchbook,  #144 Bleeding Hearts

-Watercolor and micron pen-

Bleeding Hearts Watercolor pictureLooking back, I think I will try using pens a bit more with my watercolors.

Something about this flower makes me smile, maybe because the little hearts are dancing and singing and it is overflowing with love.

Happy Painting!

-Patty Anne-

Then & Now – Tulips

Tulips have been a bit challenging for me, but I think I’ve come a long way.

Watercolor Tulips – Then

Tulip garden 2016
Tulip Garden – March 2016 watercolor painting

and now, April 2017 (hopefully, you will agree that this is much improved)

Blushing Tulips 2017
Blushing Tulips – April 2017 watercolor painting

Today I framed the Blushing Tulips watercolor painting to give to my Mom on Mother’s Day.   I really hope she likes it.

What I’ve learned:

Keep painting and journaling.  Note what works and doesn’t work for you.

Loosen up and have fun.  When I’m playing and not trying so hard, I usually have better results.

The Rigger brush is great for adding in fine details, a splash of color, or extra definition at the end.

Know when to put down the brush and stop so that you don’t overwork your painting.

Happy Painting!

– Patty Anne –

 

Tea Time & Watercolor Tips

Actually, I am more of a coffee person but I thought I would share this class project from 2016 with you.

A few watercolor tips:

  • A little planning goes a long way.  A small sketch will help you find the best composition for your subject before you start painting.
  • Paint what you see, not what you know.
  • Keep painting and don’t worry about making mistakes, you can learn a lot from them.  Allow yourself to take risks and try different techniques when learning to paint, you may be surprised with your results.
  • When you are learning to paint with watercolor, I recommend starting small with paintings that take only an hour or so of your time.  Completing small paintings will give you a sense of accomplishment,  provide you with many opportunities to try new things, and help you build your confidence painting with watercolor.
  • Document and journal your work.  Over time you can see how much you have improved.  I keep a journal of my work listing:  the painting number, painting title, date completed, paper used, brushes used, and sometimes the painting inspiration.
  • Have fun and enjoy!

Happy Painting!